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'^33 (THE 

TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



ON THE WORK OF THE 



FABIAN SOCIETY 



la^-'^ 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED 



31st M ARCH , 1909. 



Presented to and adopted by the Annual Meeting of the 
Society on 14TH May, iqoq. 



Also the Rules of the Society. 



Published by 

THK FABIAN SOCIETY, 3 CLEMENT'S INN, STRAND, 

LONDON, W.C. 

June, 1909. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
1909—10. 



Miss MABEL ATKINSON. 

H. GRANVILLK BARKER. 

Dk. ETHEL BENTHAM. 

HUBERT BLAND. 

F. LAWSON DODD. 

R. C. K. ENSOR. 

L. HADEN GUEST. 

Rev. STEWART D. HEADLAM. 

Miss B. L. HUTCHINS. 

AYLMER MAUDE. 

Mrs. H. 



L. G. CHIOZZA MONEY, M.P. 
Miss M. B. MURBY. 
EDWARD R. PEASE. 
Mrs. PEMBER REE\'ES. 
W. STEPHEN SANDERS. 
CLIFFORD D. SHARP. 
G. BERNARD SHAW. 
•Mrs. BERNARD SHAW. 
GEORGE STANDRING. 
SIDNEY WEBB. 
G. WELLS. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance and General Purposes Committee. — Aylmer Maude (Chairman), 
R. C. K. Ensor (Vice-Chairman), Dr. Ethel Bentham. Hubert Bland, 
L. H.a.den Guest, L. G. Chiozza Money, Cliffokd D. Sharp, G. Bernard 
Shaw, Sidney Webb. 

Organizing and Propaganda Committee. Miss M. B. Murby (Chairman), 
Clifford D. Sharp (Vice-Chairman), Miss Mabel Atkinson, Dr. Ethel Bent- 
ham, F. Lawson Dodd, R. C. K. Ensor, Rev. S. D. Headlam, Mrs. H. G. Wells. 

Publishing Committee. —Hubert Bland (Chairman), Mrs. Bernard Shaay 
(Vice-Chairman), H. GRANVILLE Barker, L. Haden Guest, Rev. S. D. Headlam, 
Miss B. L. Hutchixs, Mrs. W. P. Reeves, G. Bernard Shaw, G. Standring. 



//oJ!. rreasiirer : 
HUBERT BLAND. 



//o)/. Auditor : . 
W. HECTOR THOMSON. 



Secretary : 
EDWARD R. PEASE. 



Bankers : 
LONDON AND COUNTY BANK. 



Office : 
3 CLEMENT'S INN, STRAND, LONDON, W.C. 



^be jfabian Society, 



ESTABLISHED 1883. 



Twenty SIXTH Annual Report of the Execiti\e Committer 
FOR the Year ending 31ST March, 1909. 

Adopted by the Annual Meeting on 14TH May, 1909. 



POLITICAL, like commercial, growth does not proceed with a 
uniform steadiness of advance ; it has its periods of activity 
and depression. The success of the Labor Party at the General. 
Election in 1906 was the main factor in arousing universal interest 
in Socialism, and afforded a quite exceptional opportunity for propa- 
ganda ; but at present popular attention appears to have turned to 
other topics, and the recruiting of Socialist forces begins to flag. 
We must therefore endeavour by educating our members, elaborating 
our theories and consolidating our forces, to prepare ourselves in 
every possible way for theopportunity presented by the next period 
of advance. 

The Taunton Election. 

At the date of our last report the response of the members to 
the circular inviting subscriptions to a guarantee fund for the purpose 
of promoting the election of Fabians to Parliament was being 
awaited. The circular was sent round twice, and in the end the sum: 
of ^2,637 was promised, payable in instalments over five years. 

In the middle of February the Committee decided that the 
pending bye-election at Taunton offered a favorable opportunity 
for Fabian intervention. It was not pretended that there was any 
probability that the seat would be won at the first attempt, but the 
only other candidate in the field, the Hon. W. Peel, was a strong 
opponent even of the moderate instalments of Socialism which are 
found in the program of the London County Council Progressives,. 



and the constituency was in a district where the forces of Socialism 
and Labor had not yet been proved. Frank Smith, L.C.C., was 
willing to undertake the short and sharp campaign which the circum- 
stances required, and he proved to be an excellent candidate for the 
place. It was therefore decided to put him forward under the 
auspices of the Labor Party, whose Executive entertained the pro- 
posal with cordiality, sent their leading men as speakers, and appointed 
their election agent to take charge. 

The contest evoked the greatest interest in the locality, and 
brought home to the people of the district the whole range of the 
new ideas which are beginning to dominate politics. The campaign 
was fought on Socialism from the first day to the last, and every vote 
polled by our candidate was given by an elector who was thoroughly 
aware that he was voting for Socialism. 

The result was : 

Hon. W. Peel (C) 1,976 

Frank Smith (Lab.) 1,085 



Majority ... ... ... 891 

The total cost of the election was ^'315 14s. lod. The Labor 
Party sent their regular contribution (25 per cent, of the Returning 
Officer's fee) of ^14 2s. 6d., and ^26 19s. 8d. was received as sub- 
scriptions sent otherwise than through the Fabian Society. The 
cost to us was, therefore, ^274 12s. 8d. This was met by a call of 
one 3^ear's quota from the guarantors of the Parliamentary Fund. 
This realized _;^422 up to March 31st, when a balance of over ^140 
was in hand, the bulk of which has been transferred to a deposit 
account in the names of the trustees of the Fund. Since the close 
of the financial year a further amount has been received. 

Frank Smith was subsequently Labor candidate at the bye- 
election at Croydon, this time on behalf of the LL.P. He polled 
886 votes, a heavy reduction on the Labor poll of 1906. 

Meetings of the Society. 

Seventeen meetings of the Society have been held during the 
year, four less than last year, when there were two special and one 
additional lecture and one members' meeting called by requisition. 
But four of this vear's meetings were held in St. James's Hall, and 
were, therefore, on an unusually large scale. Three of these 
formed a series of propaganda meetings, specially designed to attract 
audiences from the outside. In each case the time was occupied by 
an address from the chair and by two other speakers. Members 
were admitted free and tickets were sold to others. By this method 
the expenses of the hall and of advertising were more than covered. 
The fourth of the St. James's Hall lectures was called on the publi- 
cation of the Reports of the Royal Commission on the Poor Laws 
to hear an address by Sidney Webb on " The Remedy for Un- 
employment." In this case ever}' seat was paid for. A crowded 
audience listened to a lecture of quite exceptional importance, and 
a substantial profit was realized. 



The Autumn lectures at Essex Hall consisted of a series of six, 
giving an exposition of the chief points in the Basis of the Society, 
by members of the Executive Committee. These meetings were 
confined to persons connected with the Society, and in most cases 
were well attended. 

With the exception of Mr. Theodore Morison, who lectured on 
India, and Mr. W. Watson Rutherford, M.P., who gave an address on 
Tory Democracy, all the speakers and lecturers of the year have been 
members of the vSociety. 

The following is a complete list of the meetings : 

At Essex Hall. 
" The Collectivism of the Indian Government 
" The Woman Question "... 

"The Faith I Hold" 

" Tory Democracy " W. WaTSON RUTHERFORD, M. P. 

" A Workable Scheme for Railway Nationalization " .. A. Emil Davies 

Exposition of the F.abian Basis. 
"The Fabian Society consists of Socialists " and 

works for " the spread of Socialism " 
.■\nd for " The Emancipation of Land from 

Individual and Class Ownership " ... Rev. STEWART D. HeaDLAM 

And of " Industrial Capital " EDWARD R. PeaSE 

Together with "Industrial Inventions" ... 

"Without Compensation " ... 

And without " Interference with Personal Liberty 



April 


lO. 


April 


24. 


May 


8. 


June 


19- 


Feb. 


12. 


Oct. 


9- 


Oct. 


23- 


Nov. 


13- 


Nov. 


27. 


Dec. 


II. 


Dec. 


18. 



Theodore JNIgrison 

Miss M. MuRBV 

Sir Sydney Olivier 



Bernard Shaw 



S. G. HOBSON 

Sidney Webb 
R. C. K. Ensor 



Jan. 22. 
Feb. 26. 
March 19. 



At St. James's Hall. 
(Propaganda Series.) 

The Politics of Socialism " 

Sidney Webb, R. C. K. Ensok, Aid. Wm. Sanders 
Socialism and the Churches " 

Rev. S. D. Headlam, Rev. R. J. Campbell, Rev. Conrad Noel 
Socialism and Race Welfare " 

Hubert Bland, Dr. Ethel Bentham, F. Lawson Dodd 



March 5. " The Remedy for Unemployment " 



Bernard Sha\v, Sidney Webb 



Business Meetings .vr Essex Hall. 

May 22. Annual Meeting. 

Jan. 8. Business Meeting. (Amendments to the Rules, consideration of the 
Constitution, etc.) 

NkW SOCIKTIKS. 

The formation of Fabian Societies outside London has gone on 
at about the same pace as last year. New societies have been formed 
at Bristol, Edinburgh, Huddersfield, Ilford, Leicester, Manchester 



University, Marlborough, Reading, WalsalP and York ; the Leeds 
Society has been revived ; the East Middlesex Group has become 
the Palmers Green and District Fabian Society ; and a group has been 
established at Harrow. On the other hand, the society in Canterbury 
has become extinct and the Newcastle Group is in a state of suspension. 
Deducting these two, the number of provincial societies and groups 
at the end of March last was thirty-nine, of which six are in con- 
nection with universities. The number last year was twenty-seven, 
of which five were university societies. 

London Local Groups. 

In London new groups have been started at Sidcup and South- 
wark. The Northern Heights has been dissolved and the Lyceum 
Club Group has suspended operations for the present. The Kensing- 
ton and District Group organized a course of Suburban Lectures at 
the Chelsea Town Hall, arranged a debate on Unemployment at the 
Kensington Town Hall, and held a series of other gatherings. The 
Lewisham Group held a large meeting at New Cross addressed by 
G. Bernard Shaw, and a course of Suburban Lectures at Ladywell, 
besides other meetings. The Clapham Fabian Society ran a series 
of public meetings. The Central District Group held debates with 
other organizations besides holding meetings at Prince Henry's 
Room and at the Fabian Offices. The Marylebone and Paddington 
Group held a Suburban Course as well as other lectures. The St. 
Pancras Group and Forest Gate Group also organized Suburban 
Courses, and arranged meetings on various subjects. The Hamp- 
stead Group held several garherings, which were addressed by the 
Rev. Perc}- Dearmer and others. 

Subject Groups. 

The activities of the Subject Groups have been fairly numerous. 
The Education Group has held a series of well attended meetings at 
Clifford's Inn, at which lectures on educational subjects were given 
by Professor Patrick Geddes, Professor M. E. Sadler, Reginald Bray, 
L.C.C., and others. The Local Government Group has met fre- 
quently and discussed a number of problems preparatory to the 
drawing up of a detailed statement of policy with regard to several 
important subjects relating to local government. It has also begun a 
thorough study of the Reports of the Poor Law Commission. The 
Women's Group has increased in membership from 53 twelve months 
ago to 210. The group has held a number of meetings, at which 
the questions of the relationship of women to local government and 
the conditions of economic independence of women under Socialism 
were considered. The group possesses a banner designed by Miss 
May Morris and worked by members of the group. It was carried 
in several women suffrage demonstrations during the year. 

The Fabian Nursery has grown considerably during the year. 
It has held periodical meetings at the Fabian Offices. As a result of 
the lectures and discussions " the standard of speaking has become 
noticeably higher." The Biology Group has continued its course of 



lectures and discussions on the various aspects of the relation of 
biological science to social progress. 

Further particulars of the local societies and groups will be found 
on pp. 20-23. 

CoXKRRIiNCES OF GrOUI'S AND LoCAL SOCIETIES. 

The annual conference of the Executive Committee with delegates 
from the local Fabian societies and London groups instituted in 
1907, was held this year on July nth at University Hall, Gordon 
Square, and was attended by members of the Executive and two 
delegates from twelve London societies and groups, six subject 
groups, three University societies and fourteen local societies — 
seventy-three persons in all. The Parliamentary fund, Fabian 
Parliamentary candidatures, and the political policy of the Society 
were the chief matters discussed. A conference of members of the 
Liverpool, Burnley, Sheffield. Darwen, Huddersfield, Leeds and 
Manchester Fabian Societies was held at Manchester on Nov. 21st. 
Wm. Sanders was present on behalf of the Executive. The number 
of persons present was eighty-five. Papers were read on the 
" Training of Propagandists '' and on the " Work of a Provincial 
Fabian Society," followed by discussion. It was decided to hold a 
similar conference yearly. 

Suburban Lectures. 

Twenty courses of four lectures each, under the Suburban 
Scheme, were given between the beginning of October and the end 
of March by Wm. Sanders, Harry Snell, and, in one instance, by 
H. H. Schloesser, at Lewisham, Chelsea, Croydon, St. Pancras, 
Forest Gate, Paddington, Wallington, Wood Green, Ilford, Tun- 
bridge Wells, Harrow, Hornsey, Grays, Richmond, Maldon, South 
Norwood, Thornton Heath, Finchley, Westminster, and Kingston. 
The number of courses shows an increase of eight as compared with 
last year, and more applications for them were made than could be 
granted. Nine of the courses were organized by local Fabian 
societies and groups. The total net cost of the lectures amounted 
to /1 70. 

PRoyiNciAL Lectures. 

In order to assist the development of Fabian societies in the 
provinces and to widen the area of Fabian propaganda, courses of 
lectures similar to those given under the Suburban Courses were 
offered to local Fabian societies and other Socialist and Labor 
organizations. Holbrook Jackson, Clifford D. Sharp, H. H. 
Schloesser, and Wm. Sanders gave thirty-two courses, in nearly all 
cases of four lectures each, at Letchworth, Hitchin, Liverpool (two 
courses), Birkenhead, New Ferry, Carnarvon, Llandudno, Festiniog, 
St. Helens, Bootle, Halifax, Manchester, York, Sheffield. Hull, Drif- 
field, Brighton, Glasgow, Perth, Edinburgh, Bath, Yeovil, Radstock, 
Wakefield, Coventry, Walsall, Leeds, Marlborough, Midhurst, Not- 
tingham, and Leicester. Thirteen of the courses were held under 



the auspices of local Fabian societies. The audiences varied from 
about five hundred at Nottingham to about fifty at Midhurst. The 
net cost to the Societ}- of the thirty-two courses was X-^^- ^^ 
addition to these courses, Wm. Sanders gave ten lectures in Glasgow 
and suburbs, Dumfries, and Dunfermline, under the auspices of the 
Glasgow Fabian Society, which met all the expenses. 

G. Bernard Shaw took part in the work of provincial propaganda 
by addressing five big meetings at Liverpool, York, Edinburgh, 
Hull, and Portsmouth. The first four were organized by the local 
Fabian societies, and were in every instance successful financially 
and otherwise. 

Other Lectures. 

A considerable number of lectures have been given to Inde- 
pendent Labor Party branches, literary and debating societies, and 
other bodies, by members of the Society on the lecture list. Many 
of these were arranged through the Office, but societies are now 
making engagements direct with our members who have become 
known to them as lecturers. Among the hundred and fifty lectures 
and addresses given by the Organizing Secretary during the past 
year, three were held under the auspices of the German Social 
Democratic Party, on "The Socialist Movement in England," at 
Nuremberg-Furth, Bamberg, and Hof. 

Fabian Summer School. 

This enterprise at Pen-yr-allt, Llanbedr, North Wales, has con- 
tinued to flourish. 

The Education Group organized a Conference there at Easter, 
when over forty members and others took part, and lectures were 
given on various subjects bearing on education ; at Christmas a small 
house-party was arranged. 

The Summer Session extended from 25th July to 14th Septem- 
ber, and so great was the demand for accommodation that the Com- 
mittee had to take two extra houses for the season. Social Reformers 
from the Continent and America visited the School, which is becom- 
ing quite international in its scope. 

Single lectures and courses were given by many well-known 
publicists, and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Webb communicated the ideas 
embodied later in the Minority Report of the Poor Law Commission. 

The School may now be considered an established, if indirect, 
branch of the Society's activities. 

Publications. 

Though the total receipts from the sale of literature have risen 
by fifty per cent., the sales of ordinary Tracts for the year declined. 
This is partly accounted for b}- the fact that last year between £']o 
and ^80 was received for the new edition of Tract No. 82, "The 
Workmen's Compensation Act, 1906.'' 

Another factor is the exceptionally varied character of our 
operations : we have reprinted a blue-book, issued an edition of 



poems, republished a volume by Bernard Shaw, brought out a cheap 
edition of Fabian Essays, published a dialogue on rates, prepared an 
analysis of our Tracts, and issued six Tracts in our regular series, 
four in English and two in Welsh. 

The most important of these undertakings, from every point of 
view, was the reprint of the Minority Report of the Royal Com- 
mission on the Poor Laws, which was kindly arranged for us by 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Webb, who supplied the plates of their own 
edition, and enabled "us to issue a paper edition to our members and 
their friends in two parts at 2s. for the volume entitled " Break up 
the Poor Law and 'Abolish the Workhouse," and is. for "The 
Remedy for Unemployment." We have sold and paid for 2,000 
copies of each, and a small balance of profit has been realized. Of 
the remaining 1,000 some had been sold, and final arrangements 
at the close of the year had not been made. 

The 6d. reprint of Fabian Essays was issued by the Walter Scott 
Publishing Company in December. It included a new preface by 
Bernard Shaw, and a cover designed by A. E. R. Gill, and of the 
edition of 10,000 five-sixths were sold in four months. The Fifield 
Series was continued by Vol. V., " The Commonsense of Municipal 
Trading," by Bernard Shaw, which he kindly allowed us to publish 
in this series. Two other volumes, No. VI., " Socialism and National 
Minimum," and No. VIL, '' Wastage of Child Life," were completed 
for the press during the year, but were not published till after its 
close. A new undertaking for us was the issue through Mr. Fifield 
of a collection of poems by E. Nesbit (Mrs. Hubert Bland) entitled 
" Ballads and Lyrics of Socialism," which she was good enough to 
place at our disposal. They form an attractive book, either in the 
paper edition at 6d. or in boards at is., and already enough have 
been sold to justify the experiment. 

Six new penny Tracts have been issued during the year, one 
more than last year, when five Tracts and one Leaflet were published. 
The Tracts are : 



No. 138 
No. 139 
No. 140 
No. 141 
No. 142 
No. 143 



Municipal Trading." 



Socialism and the Churches." By the Rev. JOHN Cl.IFFORI). 

■ Child Labor under Capitalism." By Mrs. Hylton Dale. 
' Socialism and the Churches." In Welsh. 

■ Rent and Value." 

■ Sosialaeth Yng Ngoleuni'r Beibl." 

It Will be noted that two of these, both dealing with Christian 
Socialism, are in Welsh, and we anticipate for them a quiet and 
steady sale for some time to come. 

Much time was spent in the preparation and issue of a "Tract 
Index and Catalogue Raisonne," an abstract of all the Tracts in print, 
from No. i to No. 139, with an index of their contents and a list of 
the titles of all numbered Tracts issued. This is on sale for 3d. 

In the format of " This Misery of Boots," we have . published 
another special Tract, a dialogue by F. W. Hayes, entitled " Those 
Wretched Rates!" 



lO 



The number of Tracts and Leaflets, apart from the reprints in 
the Fabian Socialist Series, sold and distributed during recent years 
is as follows : 

Year ending March 1909 

Tracts ... 89,229 
Leaflets ... 31,760 



1908 1907 1906 

149,594 82,508 56,029 
102,160 63,360 22,060 



1905 
20,528 
29,010 



Totals 



120,989 

Receipts ... 260 

Cost of Printing 269 



251,754 145,868 78,089 49,538 

£ £ £ £ £ 

476 244 140 76 89 - 

518 329 214 87 162 

Our list of Tracts in the regular series now stands as follows : 

6d. 2d. id. Questions Leaflets Total 

Tracts of previous years 1 1 53 3 16 74 

„ 1908-9 ...0060 o 6 

I I 5q 3 16 80 

Table ok Tracts Printed and Issued during Year 1908-190Q. 



Price. 


00 


-^ 


Printed 
during year. 


5 



0^ 


c 

H 

CO 




Cost of 

Printing, 

Binding, etc., 

during year. 


CO 


Estimd. Sale 
Value of pre- 
sent stock. 


IS. 


503 


nil 


503 


470 


33 


£ 

nil 


£ 

I 


£ 
3 


6d. 


817 


nil 


817 


225 


592 


nil 


6 


I 


3d. 


2,208 


nil 


2,208 


973 


1,235 


nil 


10 


6 i 

I 


2d. 


2,041 


nil 


2,041 


1,169 


872 


nil 


4 


1 
6 


Id. 


141,647 


108,144 


249,791 


163,304 


86,497 


260 


231 


176 1 


Leaflets. 


53,340 

■ 


24,450 


77,790 


46,030 


31,760 


9 


9 


8 I 


Totals 


200,556 


132,594 


333,150 


212,171 


i2o,g8g 


£269 


£261 


£200 


1907-8 


178,320 


273,990 


452,310 


200,556 


251,754 


/518 


A76 


/210 



II 

We have to thank H. M. Hart, who has once more taken regular 
charge of one of our Hterature stalls, and also Miss Tiffen, who 
has frequently helped in this work. A large number of members 
have given valued assistance as literature sellers and stewards at our 
St. James's Hall meetings. Charles E. Ball has again given a great 
amount of time to assisting in the office work, and it is hoped that 
other members will follow his example in this respect. Now that we 
have more available space, much routine work could be conveniently 
done by volunteers, which otherwise has to be paid for. 

Book Boxes. 

The expansion in the use of our political circulating library has 
not continued to the extent we anticipated a year ago. In the 
Spring an appeal was made to members and friends for subscriptions 
for the purchase of new boxes and books, and about twenty new 
boxes, with their equipment of books, have been procured. In 
addition a large number of new books has been purchased to 
replace those which are out of date. In all about £^4S ^^s been 
spent on books for boxes and for the Members' Bookshelf, and a 
balance of ^34 has been carried forward. 

We do not anticipate that there will be any difficulty in finding 
plenty of subscribers for our boxes, though during the latter part of 
the year under review the number of unused boxes has been greater 
than for a long time past. A small expenditure of time will suffice 
to send notices to trade union branches, trade councils, and other 
bodies, many of which will certainly apply for boxes. But owing to 
special circumstances, the removal of the Office, and the sale of the 
Minority Report, we have not been able to undertake any work not 
absolutely indispensable. 

The library now consists of about 220 boxes and over 6,000 
volumes. 

The following is a classification of the subscribers for this and 
previous years : 



Year ending 


igoq 


1908 


IQ07 


1906 


1905 


]q04 


I. L. P. Branches 


45 


70 


33 


31 


15 


18 


Local Fabian Societies* ... 


II 


12 










Other Socialist Bodies 


33 


34 


30 


13 


H 


12 


Co-operative Societies 


24 


35 


23 


36 


41 


40 


Trade Unions 


15 


21 


24 


21 


19 


18 


Trades Councils 


2 


9 


II 


8 


19 


23 


Ruskin College Classes 


4 


4 


II 


II 


7 


8 


Miscellaneous 


27 


18 


23 


38 


37 


25 



161 203 155 158 15.2 144 

* These were included in other Socialist Societies previous to 1908. 



12 

The Members' Bookshelf. 

Advantage was taken of the substantial fund contributed for 
book boxes to carry out a long desired plan of providing a lending 
library for the members and associates of the Society. It was 
decided to obtain a larger number of books than were at once 
needed for book boxes, and to keep in the Office for the use of 
members a selection of works, both new and old, to be lent to 
individuals as required. Simple rules were prepared, providing that 
borrowers should repay any cost of carriage incurred, and that books 
be taken out one at a time and returned within a month. This 
plan has been much valued by the members. Since the issue of the 
Select Catalogue in August, when the scheme may be said to have 
begun full working, an average of 88 books have been borrowed 
every month, and in all 800 volumes have been taken out. The 
new Offices will enable a larger library to be available for use in this 
manner. 

Statistics of Membership, 

The following table indicates the changes in membership during 
the year : — 

T J n ^ Provincial University ., , T/^toi 

London. Country. .--•.• c • ^- Abroad. I otaL 

■' Societies. Societies. 

Men ... 753 239 350 269 63 1675 

Women ... 524 104 64 70 26 788 



Total 


.. 1277 


343 


MA 


339 


89 


2462 


1908 


... 1085 


317 


329 


205 


79 


2015 



Increase... 192 26 85 134 10 447 

The Croydon Society, with 55 members, has been transferred this year from 
"Provincial .Societies" to "London," i.e., members within reach of London for the 
purposes of evening meetings. 

Increase in men members... 18 per cent. ; last year 52 per cent. 
Increase in women members 35 per cent. ; last year 78 per cent. 

During the year, 665 candidates were elected, a number midway 
between the 817 of last year and the 455 of the previous period. 
Just before the year closed, 112 members were struck off for persist- 
ent non-payment of subscriptions ; the loss by resignation, chiefly of 
those who had only retained their membership for a year, and by 
death, was about 106. It may be observed that there is a fairly 
constant interchange between the categories of connection with the 
Society, associates and subscribers becoming members, and vice versa. 

The number of associates is 214, an increase of 51 during the 
year. 

The number of members of Provincial Societies who are not 
members of the London Society is about 500. 



13 

Minor Matters. 

New Offices. — Towards the end of the year an opportunity 
presented itself for obtaining larger Offices, the need for which had 
long been felt, at a reasonable rent and in the same building as the 
old ones. The change, which was effected at the end of February, 
involves a certain increase of standing expenses and a substantial 
outlay for new furniture, only a part of which had been incurred at 
the close of the financial year. But the new board room, which will 
hold fifty or sixty people," will be suitable for many Group meetings 
and other gatherings which have hitherto been held in rooms hired 
for the occasion. 

"Parish Councils and Village Life." ThisTract,printed just before 
the close of the previous year, was sent with a covering letter to 10,000 
chairmen of parish councils and meetings and of rural district councils. 
A number of appreciative letters were received, and no doubt the 
information was of value to many who did not trouble to send 
acknowledgments of it 

" New Worlds for Old." By the generosity of a member resident 
in Burmah, we were enabled "to send copies of Mr. Wells's most 
attractive exposition of Socialism to 100 libraries, mostly of a semi- 
public character, which gave evidence that they would appreciate 
the gift, and had not sufficient funds to buy freely whatever they 
required. 

The Year's Finance. 

The total sum contributed by our members and friends for the 
purposes of the Society during the year was ^^f 1,920 ; and in this total 
/I5q given for Book Boxes is not included, nor is the sum of /75 
provided for an experiment in school meals conducted by Dr. Haden 
Guest, nor /337 lent through the Society to the Bail Fund for the 
old Russian Revolutionist, Nicholas Tchaykovsky, nor /20 for gifts 
of " New Worlds for Old." 

Except in "special subscriptions"— a particularly variable class, 
which showed a rise of /220 last year, and has fallen again by nearly 
the same amount— these contributions are not unsatisfactory, since 
last year many members gave more than the average in response to 
the special appeal sent out in the summer of 1907. 

The receipts and expenditure connected with the ordinary Tracts 
show a heavy decline, partly to be accounted for by the large editions 
of "The Workmen's Compensation Act" sold last year, and partly 
by the unusual number of other publications which we have issued. 
Last year we expended net about /154 in payments to Mr. FifieM 
for our Fabian Socialist Series, published by him on our behalf; this 
year he has repaid us ^^280, and our own sales (including, however, 
the sixpenny edition of "Fabian Essays") are estimated to be about 
/45, whilst we have paid him, on account of new publications, 
binding, etc., the sum of /135. The result of these transactions is 
a substantial profit for the year. 

The net loss on printing Tracts was only /g, the smallest for 
many years. It must be recollected that some 15,000 Tracts have 



14 

been sent out to members and others with Fabian News^ the cost of 
which is borne by this account. 

Our meetings at St. James's Hall showed a profit of _^47 ; but 
the annual Soiree at Portman Rooms resulted in a small deficit. 

On lecturing in the suburbs and provinces, and on organizing, we 
have expended out of income the large sum of ^373, an increase of 
^246 over last year. 

In the coming year our standing charges for the larger offices 
and larger meeting hall will be heavier than before, and members 
must be prepared to increase their subscriptions whenever possible, 
if they desire the work of the Society to be maintained at its present 
standard of efficiency. 

The Executive Committee. 

At the election in April, iqo8, seventeen out of the nineteen old 
members who offered themselves were re-elected, together with four 
new candidates. During their year of office iMessrs. H. G. Wells and 
S. G. Hobson resigned because they were no longer in agreement 
with the policy of the Society, and the Rev. R. J. Campbell through 
inability to attend the meetings. Owing to the date of Mr. Hobson's 
resignation a bye-election to fill these vacancies was not required. 
This report is, therefore, submitted by the remaining eighteen 
members. 



H. GRANVILLE BARKER. 

HUBERT BLAND. 

F. LAWSON DODD. 

R. C. K. ENSOR. 

L. HADEN GUEST. 

STEWART D. HEADLAM. 

B. L. HUTCHINS. 

AYLMER MAUDE. 

L. G. CHIOZZA MONEY. 



MILLICENT B. MURBY. 
EDWARD R. PEASE 
MAUD REEVES. 
W. S. SANDERS. 
G. BERNARD SHAW. 
CHARLOTTE F. SH.MV. 
ETHEL SNOWDEN. 
SIDNEY WEBB. 
CATHERINE WELLS. 

Executive Commiiiee, iqoS-q. 



15 
RULES. 

Definitions. 

1. — The words " due notice " shall mean that the notice is received by the 
General Secretary before the 23rd day of any month for publication in the next issue 
of Fabian News, or as provided in Rule 8, Clause 2. 

2. — A public meeting shall mean a meeting to which non-members are admitted. 
A private meeting shall mean a meeting confined to members of the Society. 

The Executive Committee. 

3. — Before the Annual Meeting to be held in May, the Society shall elect by 
ballot a Treasurer and an Executive Committee of twenty-one members to hold office 
for one year. Due notice shall be given of all nominations for these offices. Voting 
papers shall be sent to all members, together with the April number of the News, 
and the}' shall be returned to the General Office on or before April 20th. 
Scrutineers shall be appointed by the Society, whose dut}' it shall be to open the 
ballot-box, to count the votes, and to certify to the General Secretary before April 23rd, 
for publication in the Xews, the number of votes polled. The new Executive shall 
come into office on April 25th. In case of Easter occurring about the dates named, 
the Executive may alter them, giving due notice thereof ; but no alteration shall ex- 
ceed seven days. In case of a tie, the candidate who has been longest a member of 
the Society shall be elected. Any vacancies which occur during the year shall be 
filled by election after due notice, but only in the event of the number of the Com- 
mittee falling below nineteen. Five members shall be a quorum. Any member absent 
from four consecutive meetings of the Committee or its standing Sub-Committees 
without obtaining leave of absence, shall be deemed to have vacated his seat on the 
Committee or the Sub-Committee. 

4. — The Executive Committee shall conduct the general business of the Society, 
appoint the paid officers, prepare and publish tracts, subject to Rule 9, and appoint 
all delegates to represent the Society. It shall constitute three standing sub-com- 
mittees to deal with (i) Propaganda ; (2) Publishing ; and (3) Finance and General 
Purposes. 

Committees. 

5. — Committees for special purposes shall be appointed by the Executive Com- 
mittee, but notice of such committees (exclusive of those dealing with purely Execu- 
tive business) shall be published beforehand in the Fabian News, or at private 
meetings, in order that any member desirous to serve on such committees may have 
the opportunity of sending in his or her name for consideration by the Executive. 

Order of Business. 

6. — Resolutions of which due notice has been given shall be placed on the 
agenda of the first private meeting of the Society after such notice has been pub- 
lished. Resolutions shall not be moved without due notice, except after a vole of 
urgency has been carried. Business may be taken at a public meeting, but only with 
the consent of the chairman previously obtained. 

7. — Any resolution, not affecting the constitution of the Society, its Rules or its 
Basis, maj' be declared urgent by a majority of three-fourths of the members present 
in a private meeting of not less than twenty-five members, and, if so declared, shall 
be discussed and voted upon forthwith. 

8. — When a requisition signed by not less than twenty-five members is presented 
to the General Secretary, calling for a private meeting to discuss any resolution, the 
Executive Committee shall order the resolution to be printed in FabiaN News, and 
shall appoint for the meeting the earliest convenient date thereafter. 

When a requisition of urgency, signed by not less than fifty members, is pre- 
sented to the General Secretary, calling for a private meeting to discuss a specific 
notice of motion, he shall summon such meeting for a date within fourteen days from 
the receipt thereof, and shall within seven days notify the same to all members, by 
circular or otherwise. 



i6 

Tracts. 

9. — Except in cases of emergency, notice shall be given by the Executive Com- 
mittee, either in F'abiaN News or by special circular, of any tracts proposed to be 
issued in the name of the Society, and ever}' such tract shall be submitted to the 
members at a private meeting, and shall only be published when adopted by that 
meeting. 

In case of emergency a tract may be adopted at any private meeting upon a vote 
of urgency. 

Tracts bearing the name of the author may be issued by the Executive Committee 
on behalf of the Society. 

.Membership. 

10. — Every candidate must sign a declaration that he accepts the Basis of the 
Society, and must make a contribution to the funds before election, the amount to be 
returned if he is not elected. 

The names of all candidates shall be printed in Fabian News, and candidates 
shall afterwards be submitted for election, which shall be by a majority vote of the 
Executive Committee. 

11.— Members who do not take part in the work of the Society and subscribe to 
its funds during one year may be removed from the list of members at the discretion 
of the Executive Committee. 

12. — A member may be expelled from the Society by a vote of more than three- 
fourths of the members present at a meeting of not less than fifty members. Due 
notice of the motion shall be given to the General Secretary ; but such notice shall 
not be vaUd and shall not be printed in Fabian News without the sanction of the 
Executive Committee. 

Subscription. 

13. — Members are expected to subscribe annually to the funds of the Society in 
accordance with their means. 

Associates. 

14. — Any person may become an Associate by signing a statement that he is m 
general sympathy with and desirous of promoting the work of the Society. 

Associates must pay an annual subscription of at least los., and are entitled to 
attend all the meetings not expressly confined to members, and to receive all the 
ordinary publications. But they are not entitled to vote at meetings of the Society or 
to take any other part in the management of its affairs. 

Groups, 

15. — The members resident in or near London shall, for the purpose of local 
work, be divided by the Executive Committee into Groups according to the localities 
in which they reside. Each Group shall elect a Secretary, who shall keep a list of 
the Group members, and shall organize the work of the Group. 

The Group Secretary will be removable by a vote of the Group, at a meeting 
attended by not less than one-third of the Group members, or by a vote of the 
Society after due notice has been given. 

A meeting of any Group may be summoned either by the Group Secretary or by 
the General Secretary by order of the Executive Committee. 

A Group may appoint delegates to any body dealing specially with the affairs of 
the Group area. 

Groups for particular subjects may be formed in accordance with such regulations 
as the Executive Committee may from time to time determine. 

Annual Report. 
16.— The Annual Report and Balance Sheet, made up to March 31st, shall be 
sent to members at least seven days before the Annual Meeting. 

Alteration of Rules and Basis. 

17. No alteration of, or addition to, the Rules shall be made without due notice ; 

or at any meeting other than the .Annual Meeting, except by a vote of more than 
three-fourths of the members present at a meeting of not less than fifty members. 



17 

No alteration of, or addition to, the Basis shall be made until it has been 
adopted, after due notice given, by a vote of more than three-fourths of the members 
present at an Annual Meeting, and confirmed by a similar vote at a Special Private 
Meeting held after an interval of not less than six months. 

Referendum. 

IS. — The Executive Committee may at any time refer any question to the 
decision of the whole Society, the voting to be by letter. 

Any mover of a resolution which, at a meeting of the Society, has been supported 
by not less than one hundred members may claim a poll of the whole Society, the 
voting to be by letter. If an amendment is carried, and the original resolution is 
therefore not put, the mover thereof shall have the right to demand before the next 
business that the chairman take a count of the members who support the resolution, 
and if this number is not less than one hundred, the mover may claim a referendum 
as aforesaid. 

BY-LAWS FOR LOCAL FABIAN SOCIETY AND 
FABIAN GROUP ORGANIZATION. 



I. — The County of London. 

1. Any ten or more members may, with the approval of the Executive Committee, 
form themselves into a local group. 

2. Every such group shall consist of members of the Society in its area, and such 
other Fabians as it may elect ; it may elect its own associates, provided that associate- 
ship of a group shall not, as such, confer the privileges of associateship of the Society. 

3. Every local group shall elect a secretary, who shall be the medium of com- 
munication between the group and the Executive Committee. 

4. Every local secretary shall forward a report to the Executive Committee at 
least once a quarter. 

5. Every such group shall be bound by all resolutions of the parent Society. 

6. The Executive Committee, co-operating with existing local groups, shall 
constantly work for the establishment of local groups in districts where such do not 
exist. 

II. — Special Subject Groups. 

The regulations for Special Subject Groups shall be the same as those for local 
groups in so far as applicable, except that 

Special Subject Groups shall elect their own members from amongst the 
members of the Society. 

III.— The Provinces. 

A . Local Fabian Societies. 

1. Local Fabian Societies sTrall adopt the Fabian Basis, or some Basis which has 
been sanctioned by the Executive Committee of the parent Society, and all their 
members shall sign the said Basis. 

2. Subject to the above, local Fabian Societies shall enjoy complete autonoiiiy as 
to the election of their officers, members and associates, the conduct of their business, 
and the disposal of their funds, and shall not be bound by any resolution of the parent 
Society. 

3. The reports of the local Societies shall be inserted in Fabian New s, subject 
to the exigencies of space and the general control of the editor. 

4. Conferences between representatives of the parent Society and the local Fabian 
Societies shall be held, if possible at regular intervals. 

B. Local Groups. 

1. Where no local Fabian Society exists, the Executive Committee, co-operating 
as far as possible with Fabian Societies elsewhere, shall endeavor to establish Fabian 
local groups, and such groups may be formed in any locality on the initiative of any 
local Fabians. 

2. Such groups shall be constituted of any five or more Fabians, and shall have a 
status similar to that of local groups within the London area. 



i8 

2)r. Hb6tract of Bccount6 for l^ear 

1908. 

£ s. d. £ s. a. £ s. d. 

To Balance ut Credit of Society, 31st 

-March, 1908 ... ... .. 77 14 gi 

„ Receipts diking Yeak, viz. :— 

Subscriptions from Members ... 1,169 ^ ° I1O84 7 6 

Do. Special ... 120 o o 1 320 o o 

Do. from Associates ... 130 19 7 ! 123 11 o 

Do. from Non- Members and 

Sundry Receipts 76 8 6 ' 80 7 7 

Do. lor Parliamentary Fund 422 15 o 




1,919 II I 

Sale of Es-ays (old edition on!}') ... 

Do. Tracts and N'^olumes (volumes 

being estimated at ;^45)... 

Do. \'olumes by Fifield ... 

Do. Minority Report (Fabian ed.) 

832 9 
.Advertisements ... ... ... 23 16 

Royalties ... .. ... .. 20 o 

Sale of Books. /<?5i^ Purchases ... 3 12 

Book Box Fees ... . . ... S4 o 

Book Boxes and Library: — 

Donations ... ... ... 159 i o 

Books sold, or lost and paid 

for, etc. ... ... .. 20 6 4^ 



Donation for Distribution of "New 

Worlds for Old" 
Suburban and Provincial Lectures: 

Grant 
St. James's Hall Meetings : — 

Ticket sale? 
Soiree : — 

Tickets sold 



179 7 \\ 



45 


9 


4 


500 


II 


1\ 


20 

18 

3 

87 


15 
6 
8 

10 




I 

5 



15 


4 





8 


13 


6 



100 

12S 



I 


14 16 li 
Local Contribtitions 
186 4 6 


40 


10 


II 14 

Educational Lectures 

1500 
Aiiiiiiilv for Rent 



.,^3,429 2 o ^"2,535 18 8 



19 



Ci\ 



enMncj 3l6t flDarcb, 1900, 



By Expenditure during Year, viz.: — 
Hire of Halls for Lectures, less refunds 
Fabian Essays Purchased 
Printing and Ad\ertising Tracts 
Payments to A. C. Fi field ... 
Minority Report, on account ol Cost 

Printing F.abian News 

General Printing 

Grants to Groups for special purposes 

Grants to other bodies : — 

Labor Party Dues, etc. 

International Socialist Bureau Dues 

Sundries 

Office Expenses, \ iz. : — 
Salaries 

Overtime, Typing, etc. 
Furniture for New Office and Re- 
moval Expenses ... 
Rent, Cleaning, Ccals, etc. 
Postage and Parcels 
Teleptione Subscription 
Printer : Despatching News 
Stationer}- and .Miscellaneous 

Book Boxes and Library : — 
Books and Boxes Purchased 
Balance Unexpended 

"New Worlds for Old " Purchased for 

Distribution and Postage... 
Suburban Lectures, /ess local receipts 
Provincial Lectures ... 
Organizer's Travelling Expenses 

St. James's Hall Meetings: Expenses 
Soiree Expenses 
Election Fund : — 

Net Cost of Taunton Bj-e-election 

Deposited at Bank... 

In hand 

BaL.ANCE at Credit of Society, 31st 
March, 1909 : — 
Bank Balance 

Sundry Debtors and Stock of Books 
Purchased 



Less Sundry Creditors 



I have e.xamined the above account and com])ared it with the Books and Vouchers of 
the Society, and find the same to be correct. 

9 .\rundel Street, Strand, W.C. W. HECTOR TllO.MSON. / 

May 20th^ IQOQ- Chartered .\ccouiiiant. \ 















1908. 






£ 


5. 


d. 


£ 


5. 


a. 


£ 
Deh. Bal. 29 


5. 
14 


10* 








55 


9 





80 


17 


6 


46 














33 


2 


6 


269 





4 








517 


19 


3 


IS5 


7 


9 








178 


II 


10 


2aO 








6^o 


8 


I 














137 


II 


6 


118 


19 


6 








102 


16 


2 


96 


2 


8 








23 


8 











22 


15 


10 








12 


13 


8 


14 














14 








3 


19 


6 


40 


15 


4 


I 


6 













666 


12 











570 


18 





26 


9 


10 








39 


1 1 


8 


42 


18 











4 


14 


6 


123 


17 











123 


2 


3 


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7 


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60 


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8 


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145 


6 


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183 


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20 














170 





9 








120 


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285 


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— 


473 


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5i 


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45 


19 


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^74 


::: 


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140 




















8 


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422 


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15 


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133 


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36 


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£ 


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/2,535 


18 


8 



Auditor. 



LOCAL FABIAN SOCIETIES. 

Bkdales. — At Bedales School. Meets once every three weeks 
in winter for lectures and discussions. Members seven, associates 
ID. Secretary, M. S. Pease, Bedales, Petersfield. 

Brighton. — Has two members of Brighton Town Council on its 
roll. Held lectures and public meetings, made enquiries into con- 
ditions of local employment and Poor Law administration, circulated 
pamphlets, etc. Members 28. Secretary, H. Milner Black, 16 New 
Steyne, Brighton. 

Bristol and District. — Formed October, 1908. Has two 

members of the Bristol Town Council on its roll. Meets fortnightly. 

Members 44, associates four. Secretary, J. W. Barry, 21 Beech 
Road, Horfield, Bristol. 

BucKHURST Hill and Woodford. — Held public meetings, and 
correspondence carried on in local press. Members 24, associate 
one. vSecretary, G. H. Ellis, 2 Limetree Villas, Princes Road, Buck- 
hurst Hill. 

Burnley. — Carried on a vigorous newspaper correspondence. 
Working on behalf of the proposals of the Minority Report of the 
Poor Law Commission. Members 21. Secretary, Robert Chambers, 
147 Brunshaw Road, Burnley. 

Bute. — Secretary, Thomas Smythe Paterson, Mount Park Studio. 
Port Bannatyne. 

Cardiff. — Secretary, A. E. Shippobotham, ^^ Oueen Street, 
Cardiff. 

Carnarvon. — Secretary, I. R. Jones, Idan House, Constantine 
Road, Carnarvon. 

Chelmsford. — Members include a rural district councillor and 
poor law guardian. Holds periodical meetings. Members 13. 
Secretary, W. G. Smith, Galley Hall, Galleywood, Chelmsford. 

Coventry. — Secretary, Rev. P. E. T. Widdrington, St. Peter's 
Vicarage, Coventry. 

Croydon. — Organized two courses of lectures. Published Tract on 
School Feeding. Discussion meetings held. Members 65, associates 
14. Secretary, H. A. Oakeshott, Downside, Coulsdon, Surrey. 

Darwen. — Carried on press propaganda, debates and public 
meetings. Members 12. Secretary, F. B. Walkden, 5 Pearson 
Street, Darwen. 

Edinburgh. — Formed February, iqog. Secretary, Jas. G. Glen, 
M.A., 19 Downie Terrace, Murrayfield, Midlothian. 

Glasgow. — The local lecture list issued to several hundred 
church and literary societies, I.L.P., and trade union branches. 
About 100 lectures given by local lecturers. Two series of meetings 
organized in conjunction with parent Society. Press Committee 



21 



contributed articles to local papers. Members 85. associates six. 
One town councillor, one parish councillor, one school board member 
on roll. Secretary, D. Berry, 4 Newlands Park, Newlands, Glasgow. 

Harrow (F.G.)— Formed July, iqo8. Meets monthly for dis- 
cussion. Held course of lectures. Members 18, associates nine. 
Secretary, Cosmo Rowe, 71 Mason's Avenue, Harrow. 

HuDDERSFiELD.— Formed December. iqo8. Meetings held deal- 
ing with local government. Members 14. Secretary, H. Shaw, 
25 Newsome Road, Huddersfield. 

Hull.— Secretary, E. V. Teesdale, 188 Park Avenue, Hull. 

Ilford. — Formed April, iqo8. Lecture course organized. 
Lectures given by members to other bodies. Press propaganda 
carried on. Members 38. Secretary, F. Bowman, 83 Woodlands 
Road, Ilford. 

Leeds and County.— Secretary, P. Hammill Baldwinson, 15 
Winnie Terrace, New Wortley. 

Leicester. — Formed June, 1908. Secretary, H. J. B. Craven, 
Kelmscott, Wigston Fields, Leicester. 

Letchworth.— Held course of lectures, a debate, and public 
meetings, besides members' meetings, garden party, soiree, reading 
circles, etc. Working on Minority Report. Issued a manifesto on 
Socialism. Members 115, including one member of rural district 
council and one parish councillor. Secretary, W. J. Brooks, West- 
holm, Letchworth. 

Liverpool. — Activities too numerous to mention. Society pub- 
lishes this year a sixteen page report showing that " numbers, 
finances andzeal of the society are now stronger than at any previous 
period in its history." Members 140, associates three. Secretary, 
A. Reeves, 316 Derbv Road, Bootle. 

Llandudno.— Formed March, IQ09. Secretary, F. W. Knowles, 
Borthyn, Victoria Avenue, Llandudno. 

Manchester.— Members' meeting held weekly. Members have 
given about 100 lectures to other bodies. Carried on press propa- 
ganda. Committee on Poor Law Reform at work. Members 107. 
Two city councillors, one district councillor and one poor law 
guardian on roll. 

Marlborough.— F'ormed May, 1908. Held open-air and indoor 
meetings usually once a month." Members 11. Secretary, S. F. 
Goodchild, Meggen, Marlborough. 

Palmers Green and District. — Formed October, iqo8. Held 
course of lectures and public meetings. Local clergy circularised. 
Press propaganda. Members 28, includini; one di.strict councillor. 
Secretary, F. A. Browne, 38 Meadowcroft Road, Palmers Green, N. 

Phkth. — Secretary, Thomas T. Watson, Karpotna, Craigend, 
Perth. 



Rkading. — Formed November, iqo8. Holds meetings monthly.. 
Members 29, associates six. Secretary, Miss Mabel E. Lawrence, 
58 Donnington Road, Reading. 

Shkkfikld. — Held meetings both in and outside Sheffield. Press 
propaganda. Members 89, associates two. One city councillor and 
one elective auditor on roll. Secretary, I. H. Bingham, q Melbourne 
Road, Sheffield. 

SouTHPORT. — Held open-air meetings in Southport and sur- 
rounding district. Lectures given by members to other societies. 
Members 37, associates two. Secretary, John H. Goulding, jnr., 
38 Chestnut Street, Southport. 

S\VANSf:A (F.G.) — Secretary, Paul Cocks, 7 Mirador Crescent, 
Swansea. 

Walsall. — Formed November, 1908. Meetings held twice 
monthly. Press propaganda. Course of lectures held. Members 
23, associate one. vSecretarv, W. G. Hill, 6^ Wednesbury Road, 
Walsall. 

York. — Formed May, 1908. Outdoor meetings held. Course 
of lectures and big meeting organized. Members 30. Secretary, 
E. Lionel Cook, Clifton Manor, York. 

UNIVERSITY FABIAN SOCIETIES. 

Cambridge. — Assisted investigations into condition of labor in 
Cambridge for Minority Report. Held a series of public meetings. 
Members 90, associates 138. Secretary, G. H. S. Pinsent, Trinity 
College. 

Edinburgh. — Secretary, F. W. Wallace, LTniversity Union, 
Edinburgh. 

Glasgow. — Supported candidature of J. Keir Hardie, M.P., for 
Rectorship. Held lectures and debates. Held conference with 
Edinburgh U.F.S. Members 60, associates 14. Secretary, Wm. L. 
McKinlay, Ellenbank, Montrose Street, Clydebank. 

London. — Held lectures and joint meeting with Oxford and Cam- 
bridge U. F. societies. Members 30. Secretary, V. Serebriakoff, 
East London College, E. 

Manchp:ster. — Formed January, 1909. Secretaries, Miss Mary 
Benson, 13 Bates Street, Longsight ; J. H. Doughty, " Dawlish,'' 
Victoria Park, Manchester. 

Oxford. — Held lectures and debate. Members 84, associates 67. 
Secretary, F. K. Griffith, Balliol College. Secretary of Women's 
Group, Miss J. M. Upcott, Somerville College. 



23 

LONDON GROUPS. 

Ckntkal District. — Secretary, Miss Agnes F. Dodd, 3 Lincoln's 
Inn Fields, W.C. 

Clapham and District (F.S.)- — Secretary, Miss M. Murbv, 
135 Ramsden Road, Balham, S.W. 

DuLWiCH. — Secretary, St. John G. Ervine, 13 Champion Park,S.E. 
Forest Gate. — Secretary, Mrs. Whitwell, 36 Upton Avenue, 
Forest Gate, E. 

Hampstead. — Secretary, T.Barratt, 1 10 Heath Street, Hampstead. 

Kensington and District. — Secretary, E. d'Auvergne. 2 Mar- 
garetta Terrace. Chelsea, S.W. 

Lewisham and District. — Secretary, Laurence E. V. Tiffen, 51 
Sprules Road, Brockley. 

Marvlebone and Paddington. — Secretary, Miss C. L. Hayland, 
200 Wymering Mansions, Elgin Avenue, W. 

St. Pancras. — Secretary, C. Game, 8 Primrose Hill Studios, N.W, 

SiDCUP AND District. — Secretary, Miss Rose Gardner, 21 Gran- 
ville Road, Sidcup. 

Soin'HWARK. — Secretary, F. Keeling, 57 Liverpool Street, Wal- 
worth. 

SUBJECT GROUPS. 

Arts. — Acting Secretary, T. Wilson, 30 Red Lion Square, W.C. 

Biology Group. — Secretary, Dr. Lionel Tayler, 8 Adys Lawn, 
St. Paul's Avenue, Willesden Green, N.W. 

Education Group. — Secretary, Mrs. P. M. Crosthwaite, Uplands, 
Frog Hole, Westerham, Kent. 

Fabian Nursery. — Secretary, Miss Rosamund Bland, Well Hall, 
Eltham, Kent. 

Local Go\ernment.— Secretary (pro tern.). G. R. Blanco White, 
331 Upper Richmond Road. S.W. 

Women's Group.— Secretary. Mrs. Charlotte M. Wilson, 8a 
Hanover Court, W. 



SociAi.CoMMiTTEE. — Mrs. Bischot-Collin>. 7 Red Lion Square, W.C. 



FABIAN SOCIETY.— The Fabian Society oonslste of SooialistB. A state- 
ment of ItB Rules and the following publioaticns oan be obtained from the 
Seoretary, at the Fabian Office, 3 Clement's Inn, London, W.O. 
THIS MISERY OF BOOTS. By H. G. Wells. 3d., post free 4d. 
".THOSE WRETCHED RATES!" a Dialogue. By P. W. Hayes, id. 

TRACT INDEX AND CATALOGUE RAISONNE. 3d. 

FABIAN ESSAYS IN SOCIALISM. New Preface by Bernard Shaw 

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FABIAN TRACTS and LEAFLETS. 

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I. — General Socialism in its various aspects. 

Tbacts. — 142. Rent and Value. 139. Socialism and the Churches. By 
Rev. John Clifford, D.D. 138. Municipal Trading. 121. Public Service 
versus Private Expenditure. By Sir Olivbb Lodge. 113. Communism. 
By Wm. Morris. 107. Socialism for Millionaires. By Bernard Shaw. 133. 
Socialism and Christianity. By Rev. Percy Dearmer. 78. Socialism and 
the Teaching of Christ. By Dr. John Olippobd. 42. Christian Socialism. 
By Rev. S. D. Headlam. 79. A Word of Remembrance and Caution to 
the Rich. By John Woolman. 75. Labor in the Longest Reign By Sidney 
Webb. 72. The Moral Aspects of Socialism. By Sidney Ball 69. 
Difficulties of Individualism. By Sidney Wbbb. 51. Socialism: Trie 
and False. By S. Webb. 45. The Impossibilities of Anarchism. By 
Bebnabd Shaw (price 2d.). 7. Capital and Land (7th edn. revised 1908). 
5. Facts for Socialists (11th ed., revised 1908). Leaflets— 13. What Soci- 
alism Is I. Why are the Many Poor? Welsh Tracts— 143. Sosialaeth 
yng Ngoleuni'r Beibl. Gan J. R. Jones (Caernarfon). 141. Translation 
of 139. 87. Translation of 78. 38. Translation of 1. 

II. — Applications of Socialism to Particular Problems. 

Tbacts. — 140. Child Labor under Capitalism. By Mrs. Hylton Dale. 136. 
The Village and the Landlord. By Edward Carpenter. 135. Paupers and 
Old Age Pensions. By Sidney Webb. 131. The Decline in the Birth-Rate. 
By Sidney Webb. 130. Home Work and Sweating. ByMissB.L. Hutchins. 
128. The Case for a Legal Minimum Wage. 126. The Abolition of Poor 
Law Guardians. 122. Municipal Milk and Public Health. ByDr. F. Law- 
BON DoDD. 125. Municipalization by Provinces. 119. Public Control of 
Electrical Power and Transit. 123. The Revival of Agriculture. 118. 
The Secret of Rural Depopulation. 1x5. State Aid to Agriculture: an 
Example. 112. Life in the Laundry. 98. State Railways for Ireland. 
124. State Control of Trusts. 86. Municipal Drink Traffic. 85. Liquor 
Licensing at Home and Abroad. 84. Economics of Direct Employ- 
ment. 83. State Arbitration and the Living Wage. 48. Eight Hours 
by Law. 23. Case tor an Eight Hours Bill. Leaflet.— 104. How 
Trade Unions benefit Workmen. 

III. — Local Government Powers : How to use them. 

Tracts.— 137. Parish Councils and Village Life. 109. Cottage Plans 
and Common Sense. By Raymond Unwin. 76. Houses for the People. 
99. Local Government in Ireland. 82. Workmen's Compensation Act. 
New edition for the Act of 1906. 62. Parish and District Councils. 54. 
The Humanizmg ol the Pooi Law. By J. F. Oakbshott. Leaflets.— 
134. Small Holdings Allotments and Common Pastures: and how to get 
them. 20. Questions for Poor Law Guardians. FABIAN MUM ICIPAL 
PROGRAM, First Series (,Nos. 32, 37). Municipalization of the Gas 
Supply. A Labor Policy for Public Authorities. Second Series (Nos. 
90 to 97). Municipalization of Milk Supply. Municipal Pawnshops. 
Municipal Slaughterhouses. Women as Councillors. Municipal Bak- 
eries. Municipal Hospitals. Second Series in a red cover for Id. (9d. per 
doz ) ; separate leaflets, 1/- per 100. 

IV. — Books. 132. A Guide to Books for Socialists. 29. What to Read 
on social and economic subjects. 6d. net 129. More Books to Read. 
Supplement to October, 1906. 

V. -General Politics and Fabian Policy. 

127. Socialism and Labor Policy. 116. Fabianism and the Fiscal 
Question : an alternative policy. 108. Twentieth Century Politics. By 
Sidney Webb. 70. Report on Fabian Policy. 41. The Fabian Society 
its Early History. By Bernard Shaw. 

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